Hey, everybody! Welcome back to Tumnus

Hey, everybody! Welcome back to Tumnus’ Bookshelf where we review any and all books by and about CS Lewis and the land of Narnia. For today’s review we will be looking at Ruth James Cording’s “CS Lewis: A Celebration of His Early Life.”

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Tumnus’s Bookshelf: The NarniaFans Book Reviews: “God in the Dock”

Hey, everybody! Welcome back to Tumnus’s Book Shelf, where we review any and all books buy and about CS Lewis and the land of Narnia. For today’s review we will be looking at “God in the Dock” by CS Lewis.

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Welcome to Tumnus’s Book Shelf where we review any and all books related to Narnia and CS Lewis! For this weeks review, we will be looking at CS Lewis’s A Grief Observed.

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Hi, everybody. Welcome to Tumnus’s Book Shelf, where we review any and all books relating to CS Lewis and the Chronicles of Narnia . For today’s review, we will be looking at CS Lewis’ Christian Reflections.

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Charity Volunteers Find Rare Narnia First Edition

The Last Battle - First EditionThis would be one amazing find, as The Last Battle is my favorite book in the series. A first edition of the book has been discovered by a pair of charity bookshop volunteers. Christine and Robert Williams were sorting through a delivery of donations to the National Trust’s second-hand bookshop at Mottisfont and came across a copy of the book. Small, hardcovered, complete with a beautifully illustrated dust jacket. The book was published in 1956 and could be worth as much as £1,000.

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Real-Life ‘Narnia’ Inspired C.S. Lewis

An Umbrian hill-town now has reason to celebrate something that they have long suspected: that C.S. Lewis took the name of the town known as Narnia to use for the name of the fictional world in the Chronicles.

They have received proof by way of C.S. Lewis’s former personal secretary and biographer, Walter Hooper, who has given Giuseppe Fortunati a copy of a Latin atlas of Italy that belonged to Lewis. In it, he had underlined Narnia.

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Hey, Everbody! Welcome back to Tumnus’s Book Shelf, where we review any and all books by and about CS Lewis and the land of Narnia. Today we will be reviewing CS Lewis’s Reflections on the Psalms.

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Into the Wardrobe: C.S. Lewis’s Narnia

Jordan Davis has written an excellent article on C.S. Lewis and the Chronicles of Narnia for The Nation. It dives into Laura Miller’s The Magician’s Book, in which she is so deep into her own claimed perspective that she is in constant denial of what she wants to avoid. He writes:

Born in 1898 to a Belfast solicitor and his mathematics-trained wife, C.S. Lewis, or Jack, as he preferred to be called, was deemed by his tutor for the Oxford entrance exams to have been “born with the literary temperament,” and “while admirably adapted for excellence and probably for distinction in literary matters, he is adapted for nothing else.” It was true. An admirer of Beatrix Potter, young Jack wrote talking-animal novels and came to have hopes of success as a poet. One thing got in the way: he was not a poet. And not, by the way, in the manner in which Ford Madox Ford wasn’t a poet–Ford in his poems lived up to his standard that poetry should be at least as well written as prose. Lewis talked down to himself in his poems; this is the fatal flaw in much of what we know as bad poetry.

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This week’s mailbag features a topic that is very interesting to me: that of the relationship of J.R.R. Tolkien and his writing to C.S. Lewis and his. Other topics include what Anna Popplewell and William Moseley are up to next, and Andrew Adamson’s past in Papua New Guinea. I’ll see if I have the time to reach back into the mailbag archives after the five letters that I received this week. Be sure to look through the comments from last week’s mailbag for some fascinating follow-up information as well! Let’s get started!

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